Council on Lifestyle and Cardiometabolic Health
Early Career Development

The Council's Early Career Development program encourages and assists promising students, post-doctoral fellows and junior faculty as they seek to establish successful careers in science. At the core of these efforts is the Early Career Committee, which serves as an advocate for young investigators. Through direct interaction with the Council leadership, the committee works to ensure networking opportunities, career development symposia and service opportunities that fit the needs of the early career AHA members.

Interested in becoming a member of the Lifestyle Early Career Committee?

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Early Career Committee

Chair

Damon Swift, PhDDamon Swift, PhD
Assistant Professor, Department of Kinesiology
East Carolina University

Research Interest: The effects of different exercise training/physical activity programs on risk factors for cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes.

 

Vice - Chair

E. Lilian Sattler, PhD, BS PharmE. Lilian Sattler, PhD, BS Pharm
Clinical and Administrative Pharmacy, College of Pharmacy
Foods and Nutrition, College of Family and Consumer Sciences
University of Georgia

Research Interest: Interdisciplinary health disparity research in low-income populations with focus on relationships of food insecurity, medication management, and health outcomes.

Members

Nicole SpartanoNicole Spartano, PhD
Postdoctoral Associate, Epidemiology Department, School of Public Health
Boston University

Research interests: Dr. Spartano's research is broadly focused on understanding the role of lifestyle factors in chronic disease prevention. Her recent research has been dedicated to identifying the intensities and duration of physical activity related to lower subclinical injury of the heart and brain.

Christopher Imes, PhDChristopher Imes, PhD, RN
Assistant Professor, Acute & Tertiary Care, School of Nursing
University of Pittsburgh

Research Interest: Dr. Imes’ research targets cardiovascular health and the genomic factors that influence cardiovascular disease risk and the response to treatments and interventions.

Marcia C. de Oliveira Otto, PhD, MS, FAHAMarcia C. de Oliveira Otto, PhD, MS, FAHA
Assistant Professor, School of Public Health
The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston

Research Interest: Dr. Oliveira’s interests are on the effects of different aspects of diet on cardiovascular and metabolic health. Her current research projects include the study of circulating dietary fatty acids, their effects on cardiovascular and cognitive outcomes, the evaluation of the role of diet diversity and quality on cardiometabolic disease, and the estimation of the impact of suboptimal diet and metabolic risk factors on cardiovascular mortality in Brazil.

Casey Rebholz, PhD MPH, MSCasey M. Rebholz, PhD MPH, MS
Assistant Professor, Department of Epidemiology
Core Faculty, Welch Center for Prevention, Epidemiology, and Clinical Research
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health
Johns Hopkins University

Research Interests: The main focus of Dr. Rebholz's research is 1) biomarkers of dietary intake and biomarkers of cardiovascular disease and kidney disease risk; and 2) dietary intake as a modifiable risk factor for the prevention of cardiovascular disease and kidney disease.

Nefertiti Durant, MD, MPHNefertiti Durant, MD, MPH
Associate Professor
Department of Pediatrics
Division of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine
University of Alabama at Birmingham

Research Interest: Dr. Durant's research interest is promotion of physical activity especially in adolescents and young adults.

Noel Mueller, PhD, MPHNoel Mueller, PhD, MPH
Assistant Professor of Epidemiology
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health
Core Faculty, Welch Center for Prevention, Epidemiology, and Clinical Research
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health
Johns Hopkins University

Member at Large

Katie Mikus, PhD

Advisor

Deborah K. Young, PhD

Early Career Events

EPI | LIFESTYLE 2018 Scientific Sessions

Epidemiology and Prevention | Lifestyle and Cardiometabolic Health 2018 Scientific Sessions
March 20–23, 2018
Sheraton New Orleans
New Orleans, Louisiana
 

Learn About EPI | Lifestyle 2018

Lifestyle and Cardiometabolic Health Annual Business Meeting and Networking Luncheon

Wednesday, March 8, noon–1:30 p.m.
Skyline II, 23rd floor

A great opportunity to get caught up on activities related to the Lifestyle Council’s significant mission, and to meet some key leaders in the council. Following the luncheon, the Lifestyle Early Career Committee is pleased to host a special session titled “Your First Grant: We Did It and So Can You!”

Open to all attendees, this session will focus on providing guidance to young investigators on the process of successfully obtaining funding. Panelists will include junior and senior investigators who are funded and/or act as mentors. Topics will include AHA grants, NIH grants and other grant funding mechanisms that are tailored to research career development of trainees and junior faculty members. Panelists will share their experiences with grant writing, grant submission, and grant rejection. They will share pearls of wisdom on how to leverage early career awards to launch a successful career in CVD research. Members will also discuss the role of mentorship in successful research.

Panelists:
Bertha Hildago, PhD, MPH, University of Alabama at Birmingham
Beth Lewis, MD, MSPH, FACP, FAHA, University of Alabama at Birmingham
Chiadi Ndumele, MD, MHS, John Hopkins University
Norrina B. Allen, PhD, MPH, Northwestern University

Ticketed event. Tickets may be purchased at the registration desk if still available.

NIH Summer Institutes

Thursday, March 9, noon–1:30 p.m.
Broadway, Plaza Level

Open to all attendees, this session will discuss the NIH summer institutes, which are training programs to promote the development of postdoctoral fellows and junior scientists. Much of the cost associated with these summer institutes are provided by NIH (after a successful application) and focus on major areas in biomedical sciences. This program will focus on the summer institute programs offered through the NIH Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research (OBSSR) and the Programs to Increase Diversity Among Individuals Engaged in Health-Related Research (PRIDE) program (sponsored by NHLBI).

Presented by:
Erica Spots, PhD, NIH Summer Institutes (Office of Behavioral and Social Science Research)
Mohamed Boutjdir, PhD, PRIDE Summer Institutes (SUNY Downstate)

Open to all attendees. Space is limited.

Awards

Young Investigator Awards

The Young Investigator Awards recognize outstanding endeavors by new investigators in research activities and encourages continued biomedical research careers, related to cardiovascular function and diseases, including basic science, integrated physiology and clinical problems.

Student Scholarships

The objective of Student Scholar awards is to stimulate student scholars in medicine, nursing, public health, nutrition and other allied health disciplines to carry out research projects related to cardiovascular disease, stroke and basic science.

Educational Opportunities

Meetings and Conferences

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Disease Meetings and Conferences
  • Nutrition and Physical Activity Meetings and Conferences
  • Other Meetings and Conferences

Funding Opportunities

Searching for Funding Opportunities

Types of Grants

  • Pilot Funds include NIH R03 or small grants ($50k year)
  • NIH K awards – 2-5 years in length, large portion is PI salary with small research budget 
  • NIH R01’s  Investigator initiated awards – can be in response to PA’s— (up to $500K year, up to 5 years)
  • Responses to RFA’s
  • Other independent funding

Please visit the AHA's Research Funding Opportunities for more information about the following Grants and Awards. 

  • Medical Student Research Program
    The student research  program encourages promising students, including women and members of minority groups underrepresented in the sciences, from all disciplines to consider research careers while supporting the highest quality scientific investigation broadly related to cardiovascular disease and stroke. The research opportunity will allow students to work for 8, 10 or 12 weeks with a faculty/staff member on any project broadly related to cardiovascular  disease/function or stroke. The goal is to encourage students to consider a future academic career in this area.
     
  • Predoctoral Fellowship
    Helps students initiate careers in cardiovascular and stroke research by providing research assistance and training.
     
  • Clinical Research Program
    Encourages early career investigators who have appropriate and supportive mentoring relationships to engage in high quality introductory and pilot clinical studies that will guide future strategies for reducing cardiovascular disease and stroke while fostering new research in clinical and translational science, and encouraging community- and population-based activities.
     
  • Undergraduate Student Research Program
    The purpose of this undergraduate research training program is to encourage promising students from all disciplines, including women and members of minority groups underrepresented in the sciences, to consider research careers while supporting the highest quality scientific investigation broadly related to cardiovascular disease and stroke.
     
  • Fellow-to-Faculty Transition Award
    Provides funding for trainees with outstanding potential for careers as physician-scientists in cardiovascular or stroke research during the crucial period of career development that spans the completion of research training through the early years of the first faculty/staff position. The award provides a supportive mentored experience during this period of transition. The award will
    1. greatly enhance the awardee's chances of obtaining a high-quality faculty/staff appointment;
    2. improve the awardee's success and retention in an investigative career in cardiovascular science; and
    3. develop the mentoring skills of the awardee as a potential future mentor.
       
  • Postdoctoral Fellowship
    Helps trainees initiate careers in cardiovascular and stroke research while obtaining significant research results under the supervision of a sponsor or mentor; supports individuals before they are ready for some stage of independent research.
     
  • Beginning Grant-In-Aid
    Promotes the independent status of promising beginning scientists. 
     
  • Scientist Development Grant
    Supports highly promising beginning scientists in their progress toward independence by encouraging and adequately funding research projects that can bridge the gap between completion of research training and readiness for successful competition as an independent investigator.
     
  • Grant-In-Aid
    Encourages and adequately funds the most innovative and meritorious research projects from independent investigators.

Basic Science Track

Predoctoral Training Grants

Postdoctoral Training Grants
Early Career/Transition Grants

Clinical Science Track

Predoctoral Training Grants

Postdoctoral Training Grants

Early Career/Transition Grants

AHA|ASA Early Career Blogging Program

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The Early Career Voice

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Interested in becoming Early Career Committee Member?